MySQL Installation Troubleshooting

Before you can run the Mattermost server, you must first install and configure a database. You can start Mattermost by navigating to the /opt/mattermost/bin directory and entering the command sudo -u mattermost ./platform. If the Mattermost server cannot connect to the database, it will fail to start. This section deals with MySQL database issues that you may encounter when you start up Mattermost for the first time.

How you install MySQL varies depending upon which Linux distribution you use. However, once MySQL is installed, the configuration instructions are the same. For all distributions you must create a mattermost database and a mattermost database user. Failure to create these database objects or improperly referencing them from the Mattermost configuration file, /opt/mattermost/config/config.json, causes Mattermost to fail. The troubleshooting tips given here deal with these specific issues.

Before proceeding, confirm that your MySQL server is running. You can do this by issuing the command mysqladmin -u root -p status. When prompted, enter your password. If MySQL is running you should see output like the following:

Uptime: 877134  Threads: 1  Questions: 9902  Slow queries: 0  Opens: 522
Flush tables: 1  Open tables: 371  Queries per second avg: 0.011

If MySQL is not running, review the instructions for installation on your distribution.

Warning

Some of the commands used in this section alter the database. Use these commands only if your Mattermost installation has failed. Do not directly manipulate the MySQL database for a working Mattermost installation.

The mattermost Database

The database created during installation is named mattermost. If you fail to create this database or you misname it, you will see an error such as the following when you attempt to start the Mattermost server:

[2017/09/20 17:11:37 EDT] [INFO] Pinging SQL master database
[2017/09/20 17:11:37 EDT] [EROR] Failed to ping DB retrying in 10 seconds
err-Error 1044: Access denied for user 'mmuser'@'%' to database 'mattermost'

Note that MySQL is specifically denying access to the mattermost database. This may mean that you have failed to create a database named mattermost or you may have incorrectly referenced this database from the /opt/mattermost/config/config.json file.

Checking that the Database Exists

To confirm that the mattermost database exists, open MySQL as root by executing mysql -u root -p. When prompted, enter your password and then issue the command show databases;. This command displays all the databases. You should see something similar to the following:

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| information_schema |
| mattermost         |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| sys                |
+--------------------+
5 rows in set (0.03 sec)

No mattermost Database

If the mattermost database doesn’t exist, create a database named mattermost by opening MySQL as root and issuing the command: create database mattermost;.

If you accidentally created a database with the wrong name, you can remove it by issuing the command: drop database misnamed;.

After creating of the database, attempt to restart the Mattermost server by navigating to the /opt/mattermost/bin directory and entering the command sudo -u mattermost ./platform.

The mattermost Database Exists

If the mattermost database does exist, confirm that you have defined the database driver correctly in the /opt/mattermost/config/config.json file. Open this file in a text editor, and review the value of "DataSource". It should be:

"mmuser:*mmuser-password*@tcp(*host-name-or-IP*:3306)/mattermost?charset=utf8mb4,utf8&readTimeout=30s&writeTimeout=30s"

You should also confirm that DriverName element (found immediately above the DataSource element) is set to mysql.

If you correct an error, restart the Mattermost server by navigating to the /opt/mattermost/bin directory and entering the command sudo -u mattermost ./platform.

The Database User

During the installation you should create a MySQL database user from the mysql prompt by issuing the command

samp:create user ‘mmuser’@’%’ identified by ‘{mmuser-password}’;.

The mmuser-password value is a placeholder for the password you chose. You may also have specified an IP address rather than the wild card %.

A MySQL user is fully defined by their username and the host that they access MySQL from. These elements are separated by the @ sign. The % character is a wild card indicating that the user can access MySQL from any IP address. If the user you created accesses MySQL from a specific IP address such as 10.10.10.2, please adjust your actions accordingly.

If the user and host combination that you created does not exist, you will see an error such as:

[2017/09/20 17:06:18 EDT] [INFO] Pinging SQL master database
[2017/09/20 17:06:18 EDT] [EROR] Failed to ping DB retrying in 10 seconds
err-Error 1045: Access denied for user 'mmuser'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

Checking that mmuser Exists

To check that this user exists, log in to MySQL as root: mysql -u root -p.

When prompted, enter the root password that you created when installing MySQL. From the mysql prompt enter the command select User, Host from mysql.user;. You should see something like the following:

+------------------+-----------+
| User             | Host      |
+------------------+-----------+
| mmuser           | %         |
| debian-sys-maint | localhost |
| mysql.session    | localhost |
| mysql.sys        | localhost |
| root             | localhost |
+------------------+-----------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

User Doesn’t Exist

If 'mmuser'@'%' does not exist, create this user by logging into MySQL as root and issuing the command:

samp:create user ‘mmuser’@’%’ identified by ‘{mmuser-password}’;.

After creating a user, ensure that this user has rights to the mattermost database by following the instructions given in mysql_grants.

User Exists

If the user mmuser exists, the DataSource element of the /opt/mattermost/config/config.json file may be incorrect. Open this file and search for DataSource. Its value should be:

"mmuser:*mmuser-password*@tcp(*host-name-or-IP*:3306)/mattermost?charset=utf8mb4,utf8&readTimeout=30s&writeTimeout=30s"

If you correct an error, restart the Mattermost server by navigating to the /opt/mattermost/bin directory and issuing the command: sudo -u mattermost ./platform.

The User Password

Mattermost will fail if you use an incorrect password for mmuser. An incorrect password displays an error message such as the following:

[2017/09/20 17:09:10 EDT] [INFO] Pinging SQL master database
[2017/09/20 17:09:10 EDT] [EROR] Failed to ping DB retrying in 10 seconds
err-Error 1045: Access denied for user 'mmuser'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

The Password in config.json

The DataSource element of the /opt/mattermost/config/config.json file references the mmuser password. Open this file and search for DataSource. It’s value should be:

"mmuser:*mmuser-password*@tcp(*host-name-or-IP*:3306)/mattermost?charset=utf8mb4,utf8&readTimeout=30s&writeTimeout=30s"

Check that the password is correct. If you correct an error, restart the Mattermost server by navigating to /opt/mattermost/bin and issuing the command: sudo -u mattermost ./platform.

Unsure of Password

If you are not sure that the mmuser password is correct, attempt to log in to MySQL as mmuser by issuing the command mysql -u mmuser -p. You will be prompted for your password. If your login fails, you are not using the correct password.

With a new database installation, the easiest solution for an unknown password is to remove the existing mmuser and then recreating that user. You can do this by logging in to MySQL as root and issuing the following commands:

  • drop user mmuser;
  • flush privileges;
  • samp:create user ‘mmuser’@’%’ identified by ‘{mmuser-password}’;

If you recreate mmuser, ensure that this user has rights to the mattermost database by following the instructions given in :ref: mysql_grants.

Insufficient User Privileges

If the database exists and the username and password are correct, the mmuser may not have sufficient rights to access the mattermost database. If this is the case, you may see an error message such as:

[2017/09/20 17:20:53 EDT] [INFO] Pinging SQL master database
[2017/09/20 17:20:53 EDT] [EROR] Failed to ping DB retrying in 10 seconds
err-Error 1044: Access denied for user 'mmuser'@'%' to database 'mattermost

Examine the error message closely. The user name displayed in the error message is the user identified in the DataSource element of the /opt/mattermost/config/config.json file. For example, if the error message reads Access denied for user 'muser'@'%' ... you will know that you have misidentified the user as muser in the config.json file.

You can check if the user mmuser has access to the mattermost database by logging in to MySQL as mmuser and issuing the command: show databases;. If this user does not have rights to view the mattermost database, you will not see it in the output.

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| information_schema |
+--------------------+
1 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Granting Privileges to mmuser

If the mattermost database exists and mmuser cannot view it, exit from MySQL and then log in again as root. Issue the command grant all privileges on mattermost.* to 'mmuser'@'%'; to grant all rights on mattermost to mmuser.

Restart the Mattermost server by navigating to the /opt/mattermost/bin directory and entering the command sudo -u mattermost ./platform.